«

»

Dec 04

Music Industry on the Brink of Dying

Music Industry on the Brink of Dying

by: Nuwri Ghostleaf

Before I begin, let me make this perfectly clear. I write strictly from the heart and the majority of the time straight to the point,depending on the subject matter. I’m not trying to win a literary prize for I know those awards mainly go to writers who’s ambitions are New York Times Washington Post Wall Street Journal kind of honors.
With all due respect to ALL eyes that see read and hear this,no disrespect to your intelligence, I just want to have Written Verbal Conversations with you as the friend I see you as.Sincerely: Nuwri Ghostleaf

What are we to believe when you constantly see read and hear nothing but doom and gloom for an industry that we cannot allow to die why? because life as we know it, would not survive. Life without music is just not a real reality unlike some of the poor reality television shows being force fed to keep you blinded from what’s really being done by the Wizards behind the power curtain. Music Industry on the Brink of Dying.

Record industry dying, it's their own fault (10Sept10)Record industry dying, it’s their own fault (10Sept10)
Despite the best efforts of crooked politicians around the world trying to protect the record and film industries respective illegal cartels, their businesse…

 

 

 

The Dying Music IndustryThe Dying Music Industry
The music industry is likely one of the first casualties of the new Internet economy. Check out this video to see why this is so tragic and what we need to d…

 

Could this be one of the reasons? ,just watch and listen

More Proof The Music Industry Is FakeMore Proof The Music Industry Is Fake

 

I hope you got all the messages being conveyed here, this is an “US” problem. Imagine for just one moment no ringtones, no soundtracks no new music from radio to brain num you to DEAF! This is a very serious issue we all are facing not just musicians and songwriters and publishers, but everyone who honestly loves music.

It’s true that some people “Watch things happen” “Some people Make things happen” but a whole lot of people are going to Wonder what happen” if we let music die. Back to silent movies and actually getting to know your family and neighbors.

Just like the way of the dinosaur, what will be next movies. Some are saying it’s already happening just ask Blockbusters. Music Industry on the Brink of Dying.

This is a guest post kind of long, but very important for you as a music lover and buyer to read.

By: Anonymous
Over the past two decades,
digital, Internet and mobile
technologies have revolutionized
the way we create, find and
enjoy music. Walking down the
street, riding the subway, or
sitting at a desk, the shift from
stereo equipment to screens
is so ubiquitous we take it for
granted. For many in the music
industry, the changes have made
for a bumpy ride. But these
innovations have also opened up
nearly limitless possibilities.
Artists can create in new ways
and reach fans with tools that
weren’t even imaginable just
a few years ago. Music lovers
can share what we’re listening
to with our friends, family and
colleagues in real time, turning
them on to new favorites the
instant we find them ourselves.
Record collections are going
virtual. And new streaming
services have stretched our
car stereos far beyond five
1
Over the past two decades,
digital, Internet and mobile
technologies have revolutionized
the way we create, find and
enjoy music. Walking down the
street, riding the subway, or
sitting at a desk, the shift from
stereo equipment to screens
is so ubiquitous we take it for
granted. For many in the music
industry, the changes have made
for a bumpy ride. But these
innovations have also opened up
nearly limitless possibilities.
Artists can create in new ways
and reach fans with tools that
weren’t even imaginable just
a few years ago. Music lovers
can share what we’re listening
to with our friends, family and
colleagues in real time, turning
them on to new favorites the
instant we find them ourselves.
Record collections are going
virtual. And new streaming
services have stretched our
car stereos far beyond five
AM/FM presets.
THE DIGITAL
REVOL UTION
Major record labels are still
focused on what we do best:
finding great artists, helping
them reach their creative
potential, and connecting them
to fans. The difference is that
we’re embracing new digital
tools to do a better job than ever
before. We’re essentially venture
capitalists for music: investing
in the great, unknown artists of
today so they can become the
superstars of tomorrow.
We’ve built digital networks
to wire the 21st Century music
business, digitize recordings,
and connect seamlessly to
retailers and services selling
and streaming digital and
mobile music. The result is a
new, leaner, more nimble music
business – one that gives our
artists broader reach, creates
new ways for them to earn a
living from the work they love,
and empowers fans to find and
enjoy more music in more ways
than ever.
We’re still evolving, but a quick
glance over the last decade or so
proves that we’re on the right track.
• Over 2,500 digital services
licensed and operational today.
• $13.4 billion spent by major labels
to find new artists and help them
reach an audience.
• $20 billion spent by major labels
on artist and songwriting royalties.
• Artist royalties paid by major labels
increased over 36% as a share of
major labels’ net sales and gross
licensing revenue.
• Songwriting royalties paid by major
labels increased 44% as a share of
net sales revenue.
Helping Artists
Find Their Sound
— And Their Fans

It’s a tough job, but someone’s got to
do it. While many play an indispensable
role in the music ecosystem, there is no
doubting the value of record labels who
find great artists and work to put them on
a global stage.
In the last decade, the major labels spent
$13.4 billion to find new acts and help
them develop their sound and reach an
audience. That’s tens of thousands of
hours on the road, scouring bars and
honky tonks, and thousands more online
listening for the next underground sound.
We connect great musicians and help
them collaborate on creative new projects.
We gather the producers, engineers, and
technology it takes to bring a song to life.
We design album launch campaigns and
tours to build the kind of fan base that
launches a career.
Working hand in hand with our artists,
major labels provide the creative and
financial fuel that generates hits. Virtually
the entire music ecosystem is built atop
the foundation of this initial investment,
supporting not just artists and labels, but
anyone whose job depends on music.

Just like we’re embracing
new digital platforms, labels
are also pioneering new ways
to market artists that would
have been impossible just a
few years ago.
Daft Punk –
Random Access Memories
Sony knew it needed a global
campaign to match the
ambitious scale of Daft Punk’s
Random Access Memories. It
also faced limited funds and
its artists were two robots
who didn’t do interviews and
don’t tweet.
Building on Daft Punk’s
inspiration in film and album
premieres from the ‘70s and
‘80s, Sony created a ‘larger
than life’ campaign that
coordinated giant billboards
in major global cities with TV
advertising blocks showing
a short mysterious teaser
of the riff from Get Lucky.
Fans started to share the
teaser all over the Internet,
including one who created a
10-minute version. Daft Punk
gave their first performance
in the middle of the Australian
outback, raising buzz to a
fever pitch.
The album was released
across all formats
simultaneously. Random
Access Memories was the
biggest ever pre-ordered
album on iTunes at that point.
It hit number 1 in 97 iTunes
stores — while simultaneously
breaking the record for the
most streamed album of all
time on Spotify.
Katy Perry – PRISM For Katy
For Perry’s third studio
album, PRISM, Capitol
Music Group didn’t build
a traditional promotional
campaign that would have
focused on a single release
date. Instead, they used
several different campaigns –
making the best use of Katy
Perry’s natural ease on Twitter
and other social media –
to promote several strong
singles on PRISM.
Katy released short teaser
videos to celebrate the
release of the first single:
Roar. In one video, Katy
spelled out the lyrics to Roar
in emoticons, and the video
generated almost 70 million
views. The official video

was promoted using a classic
1930s-style Hollywood movie
poster and a series of online
teasers. The video went on to
be viewed around 360 million
times on YouTube alone, while
Roar topped the charts in
97 countries.
A promotion with MTV
and Pepsi gave fans the
opportunity to unlock song
titles, lyrics and snippets
from the album by tweeting
#KATYNOW. They could also
listen to previews of the tracks
Dark Horse and Walking on Air
and vote which they wanted
released early on iTunes.
The second single
Unconditionally was backed
by the promotional campaign
#KatyUnconditionally that
invited fans to share an
Instagram of what unconditional
love meant to them and upload
it with their story and location to
appear in an online PRISM map
of the world.
Hunter Hayes and the
YouTube Orchestra
Warner Music Nashville/
Atlantic Records wanted to
help new audiences discover
Hunter Hayes.

The label contacted YouTube
and designed a video campaign
featuring his song Everybody’s
Got Somebody But Me recorded
with label-mate Jason Mraz.
Rather than film in Nashville,
Warner arranged to shoot in
Los Angeles at YouTube’s own
creative space, the YouTube
Hangar. This enabled the label
to pull together a range of the
‘YouTube Stars’ who post their
own versions of hit songs onto
the platform together and
invite them to perform with
Hayes and Mraz.
Stars like Tyler Ward and
Kina Granis submitted their
own versions of Hayes’ song
and Warner Music Nashville
along with Hunter created
a mash-up of the results. It
brought together Hayes, Mraz
and all the ‘YouTube Stars’ to
create a one-shot music video
featuring all of them, dubbed
the ‘YouTube Orchestra’, for the
mash-up track. The individual
‘YouTube Stars’ released their
own versions of the track and
then the ‘YouTube Orchestra’
video was released ahead of the
official music video, reaching
an entire YouTube audience
online in their own terms and
connecting Hayes to millions
of potential new fans who
might never have seen a more
conventional launch campaign.

CONCLUSION:

The music business has
changed and record labels are
continuing to evolve along with
it. But we haven’t forgotten
what’s important: finding great
artists, helping them realize
their visions and connecting
them with broad audiences.
As we embrace new
technologies, we’re focused
on making them work for
artists and fans. And we’re
dedicated to supporting new
digital platforms to grow
the pie for everyone in the
business, starting with the
artists whose careers are
our mission.
With so much change, the
future may be uncertain. But no
one ever thought this business
was easy.
We know one thing for sure:
the challenges ahead will have
one hell of a soundtrack.

Music Industry Dying, Bad Musicians, JayZ King Idiot...Music Industry Dying, Bad Musicians, JayZ King Idiot…
DONATE: http://www.andrewwasson.com/donations.php http://www.andrewwasson.com/ – RadioHead’s Thom Yorke warns all aspiring & upcoming musicians to avoid the …

MUSIC Industry DYING: Lack of Talent, Artist Exploitation and Rap's Influence on Youth!MUSIC Industry DYING: Lack of Talent, Artist Exploitation and Rap’s Influence on Youth!
I discuss the pathetic state of rap and pop music, the extreme exploitation of artists, the corporation domination of mainstream music (radio stations and la…

MusicLuv, Nuwri Ghostleaf (amazonbooks.com)

 

Post to Twitter

Translate »